Author

GLASSON DESCHAUMES Ghislaine

GLASSON DESCHAUMES Ghislaine

Director and founder (in 1993) of the international journal of critical thought Transeuropéennes, responsable of the associated research team "Translating, between cultures" at the International College of Philosophy, Ghislaine Glasson Deschaumes is serving as researcher and advisor for public and private cultural institutions, working mainly on intercultural practices and policies, cultural diversity, institutions dealing with heritage (archives, libraries, museums), collective memories, articulation between knowledge and democratisation.

She initiated and directed (2006-2009) the programme "Culture and Politics" at the Maison de l'Europe de Paris, and she directed from 1992 to 2004 the NGO Transeuropéennes/réseaux pour la culture en Europe. She had worked previously at the French desk of Lettre internationale. In 1986, she organized in Paris the first significant meeting of dissident writers from Eastern Europe and of writers from Western Europe, which was held fifteen days long at the Théâtre Renaud-Barrault (a project carried out by Autrement).

Her activities have led her to participate in the reinforcement of civil society actors -Vice-Chair of the Euromed Non-governemental Platform (until the end of 2007) as well as in the contemporary artistic field (MaToMa, around the choregrapher Susan Buirge).

She has studied Literature and Philosophy and graduated at the University Lyon II (France). She is the author of articles in various journals (Rue Descartes, Drôle d’époque, Geste, Third Text, L'autre campagne, etc), art exhibition books, academic research publications. She is a co-author and the co-editor (together with Svetlana Slapsak) of the book Balkan Women for Peace (Ed. Transeuropéennes, 2003), co-editor of the book Divided Countries, Separated Cities (together with Rada Ivekovic), Oxford University Presse, New Delhi, 2003. She is the co-producer (together with les Films d'Ici and Arte) of the film Les femmes des douze frontières (directed by Claudine Bories).